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New Resource to help people benefit from social work at the end of their life

‘I think the most important support is time, the giving of time, people finding time for you, and the freedom to ask questions. Having someone independent to go to just to talk through and to say ‘I’m upset, I’m confused’ and just to gain reassurance, because it’s an awful thing to do, to have to take your loved one and leave them behind – a dreadful thing…’ (Bereaved husband in his sixties)

This resource aims to ensure that people benefit from good social work at the end of their life, and that those close to them are supported during this time and into bereavement.

Palliative, end of life and bereavement care matters to everyone. Around half a million people die each year in the UK. All of us need to be supported to consider what will matter to us when we are at the end of our lives, to plan ahead and to live well until we die.

Social work has an important role in the delivery of meaningful palliative, end of life and bereavement care. Some social workers are palliative care social workers, working in services which specialise in this area of support. All social workers will encounter people who are experiencing the end of life or bereavement.

The resource sets out what palliative care social work is, the role and expertise of palliative care social workers and what palliative care social work can offer. It aims to help people who need palliative, end of life and bereavement care to understand how social work can help them. The resource also helps all social workers to be ready to support people who are dying or bereaved

The resource finishes with actions that everyone can take to get more out of palliative care social work and social work at end of life and in bereavement.

All social workers can use this resource to consider their practice. They can promote this resource, take it to the highest level within their organisation and advocate for the importance of social work in palliative, end of life and bereavement care.

Ensuring that everyone has a good life until they die and a good death must be everybody’s business. Social workers have an important contribution to make. This resources sets out how other agencies, employers and commissioners can support them to provide this.

The resource was developed by the Association of Palliative Care Social Workers in collaboration with the former College of Social Work. We worked with Making Waves Lived Experience Network/Open Futures Research to ensure that the resource is informed by the voices of people with lived experience. It is published by the British Association of Social Workers, the independent voice of social work in the UK.

The resource is available at: www.apcsw.org.uk/resources

 
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‘Social workers must fight for service user rights and the profession’s soul’ – Community Care

Spiritual care is a core tenet of palliative care social work, but in his recent article Peter Beresford challenges the profession to remember to look after its own soul.  He argues that alliances between practitioners, service users and carers offer the best challenge to damaging policies.

See article:

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/2016/02/29/social-workers-must-fight-service-user-rights-professions-soul/

 
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Social work cries out for a hero leader

With the two chief social workers saying they don’t pretend to be the voice of the profession, there is confusion as to who, exactly, is speaking for social workers

Who speaks for social work? The question has preoccupied the profession for years and many thought it answered, at least in part, when ministers appointed not one but two chief social workers for England three years ago. But apparently not.

See article:
http://www.theguardian.com/social-care-network/2016/jan/28/chief-social-workers-voice-profession

 
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Behind the wire: meet the social workers supporting military families on an RAF base

RAF Cosford, a base nestled in the green 10 miles out of Wolverhampton, is everything you expect a millitary barracks to be. The compound is flanked with barbed wire and CCTV, uniformed oficers march in smart lines and khaki-toned aircraft zoom past overhead. Just outside the wire, a small social services office serves as a link to the outside world.

See article:
http://www.communitycare.co.uk/2016/01/28/behind-wire-meet-social-workers-supporting-military-families-raf-base/

 
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Graduate child social worker scheme rolls out across England

A scheme to recruit high-calibre graduates into children’s social work is to be rolled out across England.

Set up in 2013, Frontline has already trained 220 recruits in the South East and Manchester and is now selecting 180 graduates to take up posts from July.

See article:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35291112

 
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Thank you for Blackstar’: Palliative care doctor writes open letter to David Bowie

A week has passed since David Bowie’s death, and his son Duncan Jones, who was among the first to confirm the news last Monday, has reutrned to Twitter.

Jones shared a link to an open letter written in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) by a palliative care doctor, which shed light on the musician’s preparation for death and thanked him for his contribution to music. It has been reported, although not offically confirmed, that Bowis’s “courageous 18-month battle” was with liver cancer.

See article:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/news/thank-you-for-blackstar-palliative-care-doctor-writes-open-lette/

 
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GP workforce crisis set to undermine palliative care, BMA warns

Providing palliative care in the community will become ‘even more challenging’ if GP workforce shortages and workload pressures are not addressed, the BMA has warned.

BMA leaders have urged all UK governments to prioritise end-of-life care after research by the union found current provision – although ‘excellent’ in some areas – ‘does not match expectations’ of either doctors or the public.

See article:
http://www.gponline.com/gp-workforce-crisis-set-undermine-palliative-care-bma-warns/palliative-end-of-life-care/article/1379431

 
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Hospice boss Rhona Baillie says ‘end-of-life care must be individual’

The head of Scotland’s Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice Rhona Baillie said she agreed with the British Medical Association (BMA) that people should be treated as individuals in end-of-life care.

She said: “We understand that open communication is the only way to offer respect for patient choice, creating a gold-star level of care that is personalised to meet the needs of every patient.

See article:
http://www.thenational.scot/news/hospice-boss-rhona-baillie-says-end-of-life-care-must-be-individual.12331